What a fantastic package! I wish I’d found Wealthy Affiliates years ago. I couldn’t believe that they have been around for so long! With the training and support that they offer for the price they are asking, how can I possibly fail! Well, I suppose not taking action would be a big one. Thanks for putting together a very informative article. Great work!

So actually, the reason I personally signed up for Wealthy Affiliate is likely much different than the reason YOU want to sign up. Chances are, you want to learn about how to make money online legitimately, learn how to build a website, how to blog, and more importantly, how to earn money from that blog. I wasn’t looking for that. I already knew how to do all that stuff. Instead, I signed up as a way to vet the training, tools, and resources provided by Wealthy Affiliate because I wanted to see if it was something I could promote on this very website you’re reading.


Affiliates were among the earliest adopters of pay per click advertising when the first pay-per-click search engines emerged during the end of the 1990s. Later in 2000 Google launched its pay per click service, Google AdWords, which is responsible for the widespread use and acceptance of pay per click as an advertising channel. An increasing number of merchants engaged in pay per click advertising, either directly or via a search marketing agency, and realized that this space was already occupied by their affiliates. Although this situation alone created advertising channel conflicts and debates between advertisers and affiliates, the largest issue concerned affiliates bidding on advertisers names, brands, and trademarks.[39] Several advertisers began to adjust their affiliate program terms to prohibit their affiliates from bidding on those type of keywords. Some advertisers, however, did and still do embrace this behavior, going so far as to allow, or even encourage, affiliates to bid on any term, including the advertiser's trademarks.
In the case of cost per mille/click, the publisher is not concerned about whether a visitor is a member of the audience that the advertiser tries to attract and is able to convert, because at this point the publisher has already earned his commission. This leaves the greater, and, in case of cost per mille, the full risk and loss (if the visitor cannot be converted) to the advertiser.
Finally, if you’re only planning on “dipping your toes in the water” to see what affiliate marketing is all about, do not sign up for the premium membership. The free membership is more than enough for you to see what it’s all about. Premium membership should be reserved for those who are actually serious about building a real business for themselves. If you aren’t in this for the long-haul, there is no reason to waste your money.
My name is Jamie Spencer and I have spent the past 5 years building money making blogs. After growing tired of the 9-5, commuting and never seeing my family I decided that I wanted to make some changes and launched my first blog. Since then I have launched lots of successful niche blogs and after selling my survivalist blog I decided to teach other people how to do the same.
Leadpages claims that its affiliate program is not exclusively for affiliate marketers, which is true, but the narrow focus of this niche means that only professionals affiliate marketers will ever be able to earn significant income from the program. Leadpages’s affiliate program does offer quite a lot of different options (webinars, videos, blog posts, free marketing courses, etc.) to send referrals to, which can lead to higher conversion rates if done correctly.
Affiliate marketing overlaps with other Internet marketing methods to some degree, because affiliates often use regular advertising methods. Those methods include organic search engine optimization (SEO), paid search engine marketing (PPC – Pay Per Click), e-mail marketing, content marketing, and (in some sense) display advertising. On the other hand, affiliates sometimes use less orthodox techniques, such as publishing reviews of products or services offered by a partner.[citation needed]
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